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Keynote Speakers for ICBMG 2018

 

Prof. Vincent K. Chong
The University of Western Australia, Australia

Vincent Chong is a Professor of Accounting and Deputy Head of Department (Accounting & Finance) at the UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia. He is currently the President of Institute of Certified Management Accountants (ICMA) - Western Australia Branch. He has been appointed as a member of the ICMA’s Education Advisory Board (2018-2020). Vincent completed his Bachelor of Science (Accounting) at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, U.S.A. and Master of Business Administration at Saint Louis University, U.S.A. He completed his PhD at UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia.

Vincent Chong is a Professor of Accounting and Deputy Head of Department (Accounting & Finance) at the UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia. He is currently the President of Institute of Certified Management Accountants (ICMA) - Western Australia Branch. He has been appointed as a member of the ICMA’s Education Advisory Board (2018-2020). Vincent completed his Bachelor of Science (Accounting) at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, U.S.A. and Master of Business Administration at Saint Louis University, U.S.A. He completed his PhD at UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia.

Vincent has presented over 120 papers at research seminar series, local and international conferences. He has published over 40 scholarly refereed articles generating almost 2,000 Google Scholar citations for his work.  He has published his research in leading international scholarly journals including Accounting, Organizations and Society, Accounting and Business Research, Behavioral Research in Accounting, Management Accounting Research, The British Accounting Review and The European Accounting Review. Vincent has won more than 15 external competitive research grants, including the prestigious Australian Research Council Small Research Grant and the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants Research Grant.

Speech Title: Delegation of Decision Rights and Misreporting: A Study of Financial Services Firms
Abstract: Our study examines the mediating effect of responsibility rationalization and moderating effect of ethical climate in the relationship between delegation of decision rights and managers’ misreporting. An online survey method was employed to collect data. One hundred and thirty six middle-level managers from various United States (U.S.) financial services firms completed the online survey. Our study contributes to a better understanding of how and when delegation of decision rights increases misreporting intentions. Our results demonstrate that the mediating effect of responsibility rationalization and the moderating effect of ethical climate in the relationship between delegation of decision rights and managers’ misreporting. Specifically, our results reveal that the indirect effect of delegation of decision rights on managers’ misreporting through responsibility rationalization will be stronger when there is a higher (lower) rather lower (higher) level of instrumental (principle) climate. The theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed.

 

Prof. Steen Thomsen
Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

Steen Thomsen is Professor and founding chairman at the Center for Corporate Governance, Copenhagen Business School. He specializes in corporate governance as a teacher, researcher, consultant and commentator. His academic publications include 38 international journal articles and several books on the subject. His research is currently focused on industrial foundations – foundations that own business firms. Steen has served as a non-executive board member in several business companies and is currently on the board of two consulting firms. He is a founding board member of the International Corporate Governance Society, the Board Leadership Society in Denmark and academic director of the CBS board programs. He writes columns for the leading Danish business newspaper, Børsen, and has served as a consultant and lecturer to several large companies and government organizations. He has also contributed to best practice codes, public policy and legislation in the area of corporate governance and industrial foundations. He is married to Annette Blegvad, lives in Charlottenlund, North of Copenhagen, and is the father of two grown-up boys.
Speech Title: Ownership Structure at IKEA
Abstract: This case study examines the governance role played by the Interogo Foundation as owner of the Inter IKEA Group (the owner and franchisor of the Ikea concept) and its other subsidiaries. The IKEA businesses are the largest home furnishing operation in the world. In total, the various companies have around 200.000 employees and annual revenues exceeding 38.3 billion €. The IKEA businesses have exhibited impressive self-financed growth since their inception in 1943. During the 1980s, the original IKEA business was divided into three independent holding companies owned respectively by two independent foundations and the founding Kamprad Family. The IKEA franchise businesses also include a number of other franchisees owned by listed companies or private owners.

 

Assoc. Prof. George Shan
The University of Western Australia, Australia

Dr. George Shan is the Associate Professor in the Accounting and Finance Discipline of the Business School at The University of Western Australia. He holds Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Applied Finance, Master of Commerce (Accounting) and completed his PhD in Accounting and Corporate Governance. George is CA (Australia), CPA (Australia) and CMA (Australia). Previously, he has worked at several Australian and international universities including University of South Australia, University of Ballarat, the University of Adelaide and University of Rome Tor Vergata. Among them the University of Adelaide and the University of Western Australia are ranked the top universities in the world and Group of Eight in Australia, where he taught Financial Accounting, Management Accounting, Corporate Accounting, Accounting Concepts & Practices, Corporate Governance & Accountability, Investment Banking & Project Finance, Portfolio & Fund Management, and Financial Risk Analysis. He is a registered principal supervisor for PhD students, and his current research areas and interests include corporate governance and its related topics within accounting and finance (i.e., firm performance, accounting quality, earnings management, tunneling, audit quality, and corporate social responsibility). He has published over 30 academic journal and conference papers based in recent 5 years, including Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics, Emerging Markets Review, Family Business Review, Modern Asian Studies, Corporate Governance: An International Review and Journal of Computer Information Systems. Professor Shan received the title of “High Research Active” since 2010, and was awarded couple best paper prizes, including the Best Paper Award of 6th Annual London Business Research Conference in Imperial College, London, the UK.

Speech Title: Extending the Corporate Governance Mosaic: Managerial Ownership, Audit Committees and Non-audit Services
Abstract: We extend the prior work in the domain of corporate governance and ensuing strategic implications for companies and their auditors. Specifically, we study the sensitivity of non-audit services (NAS) fees to key corporate governance mechanisms and provide a nuanced understanding of the association of managerial ownership and audit committees with NAS fees. We find that NAS fees are negatively associated with managerial ownership in those regions of ownership that are characterised by convergence-of-interests between managers and shareholders. However, NAS fees are positively associated with managerial ownership in the ownership region that is characterised by management entrenchment. We also find that firms with stronger audit committees have lower NAS fees regardless of how managerial ownership is structured. Decisions of firms to demand NAS from their auditors and of auditors to provide NAS to their clients are important strategic decisions which both firms and auditors must consider carefully in the lights of regulatory restrictions and the related implications on perceptions of auditor independence. Consequently, the evidence of the effects of management entrenchment and audit committee characteristics on NAS provided by the study has implications for policymakers, company directors, auditors and investors.